Mythopoesis

2 articles in category Mythopoesis / Subscribe

In honor of spending the next few days at PAX Dev and PAX Prime, I thought I’d go on a little rant on that which shapes everything I think about and everything I do: narrative. The transcript of my presentation, “The Future of Video Game Narrative: Player, Agency, And Negative Space Storytelling,” can be read on Academia.edu Story and the Future of Video Game Narrative Video games are the next step in the evolution of storytelling. But like the first fifty years of cinema, we have yet to crack the perfect form of game narrative. Each time we discover a new medium to tell stories we have to experiment with the best ways to use that medium. I have read articles that argue that we have reached peak evolution for video game narrative and that there will never be any quality game stories. I disagree; we just haven’t experimented enough because we are too hung up on trying to tell the story like we would in films. The birth of cinema saw the same problem: they were too stuck in trying to tell the story like they would on stage. But there is big difference between the most effective ways …

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My dear readers who do not follow me on Facebook or Twitter may not know that I have started teaching at the North Seattle College Continuing Education department. The first class I am offering is a two-session class in Archetypes in Writing, though I hope to add a few others to my list such as Mythic Fiction and, perhaps, Playwriting. The wonderful Cole Hornaday interviewed me about the class, what will be covered, and archetypes. I have posted partial answers here, and if you wish to read further you can visit the NSC blog.   What is an archetype? Archetypes are patterns, but there is so much more to it, and to fully utilize archetypes we need to understand where they come from and why they are important. They come from what psychiatrist Carl Jung called the Collective Unconscious and are the building blocks of any story that is told—be it a creation myth, an epic fantasy novel, a Nobel-winning literary fiction, or a memoir. An archetype can be a type of character, such as a mentor, trickster, or hero, but it can also be an experience, such as coming of age or transformation through tragedy. Emotional states such as …

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